Mason J, Greiner T, u.a.: Development. Malnutrition. Vitamin A. Let food be our medicine. World Nutrition November 2014, 5, 11, 940-952 (link

Das Magazin 02_2010 enthält - Lessons Learned From Carotene Supplement Trials 7

Andreozzi VL, Bailey TC, Nobre FF, Struchiner CJ, Barreto ML, Assis AM, Santos LM, 2006. Random-effects models in investigating the effect of vitamin A in childhood diarrhea. Ann Epidemiol, 16, 241-247.
Axelrod AE, 1971. Immune processes in vitamin deficiency states. Am J Clin Nutr, 24, 265-271.

Barclay AJ, Foster A, Sommer A, 1987. Vitamin A supplements and mortality related to measles: a randomised clinical trial. Br Med J (Clin Res Ed), 294, 294-296.
Barreto ML, Santos LM, Assis AM, Araujo MP, Farenzena GG, Santos PA, Fiaccone RL, 1994. Effect of vitamin A supplementation on diarrhoea and acute lower-respiratory-tract infections in young children in Brazil. Lancet, 344, 228-231.

Batista, M et al. (WK Simmoons): A Study in the use of oral massive doses of Vitamin A. Ecol Food Nutr. 3(4) 293-298 (1974) (Scan im Archiv)


Berdanier CD, Dwyer JT, Feldman EB, 2002. Handbook of Nutrition and Food. CRC Press. Taylor and Francis Book, Boca Raton.
Bhandari N, Bhan MK, Sazawal S, 1994. Impact of massive dose of vitamin A given to preschool children with acute diarrhoea on subsequent respiratory and diarrhoeal morbidity. BMJ, 309, 1404-1407.
Bhandari N, Bahl R, Sazawal S, Bhan MK, 1997. Breast-feeding status alters the effect of vitamin A treatment during acute diarrhea in children. J Nutr, 127, 59-63.
Binka FN, Ross DA, Morris SS, Kirkwood BR, Arthur P, Dollimore N, Gyapong JO, Smith PG, 1995. Vitamin A supplementation and childhood malaria in northern Ghana. Am J Clin Nutr, 61, 853-859.
Biswas R, Biswas AB, Manna B, Bhattacharya SK, Dey R, Sarkar S, 1994. Effect of vitamin A supplementation on diarrhoea and acute respiratory tract infection in children. A double blind placebo controlled trial in a Calcutta slum community. Eur J Epidemiol, 10, 57-61.
Bloem MW, Wedel M, Egger RJ, Speek AJ, Schrijver J, Saowakontha S, Schreurs WH, 1990. Mild vitamin A deficiency and risk of respiratory tract diseases and diarrhea in preschool and school children in northeastern Thailand. Am J Epidemiol, 131, 332-339.

Cantorna MT, Nashold FE, Hayes CE, 1994. In vitamin A deficiency multiple mechanisms establish a regulatory T helper cell imbalance with excess Th1 and insufficient Th2 function. J Immunol, 152, 1515-1522.
Chew BP and Park JS, 2004. Carotenoid action on the immune response. J Nutr, 134, 257S-261S.
Coutsoudis A, Broughton M, Coovadia HM, 1991. Vitamin A supplementation reduces measles morbidity in young African children: a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind trial. Am J Clin Nutr, 54, 890-895.

Dibley MJ, Sadjimin T, Kjolhede CL, Moulton LH, 1996. Vitamin A supplementation fails to reduce incidence of acute respiratory illness and diarrhea in preschool-age Indonesian children. J Nutr, 126, 434-442.
Donnen P, Dramaix M, Brasseur D, Bitwe R, Vertongen F, Hennart P, 1998. Randomized placebo-controlled clinical trial of the effect of a single high dose or daily low doses of vitamin A on the morbidity of hospitalized, malnourished children. Am J Clin Nutr, 68, 1254-1260.
Elitsur Y, Neace C, Liu X, Dosescu J, Moshier JA, 1997. Vitamin A and retinoic acids immunomodulation on human gut lymphocytes. Immunopharmacology, 35, 247-253.
EVM (Expert Group on Vitamins and Minerals), 2002. Revised Review of Vitamin A.

Fawzi WW, Mbise R, Spiegelman D, Fataki M, Hertzmark E, Ndossi G, 2000. Vitamin A supplements and diarrheal and respiratory tract infections among children in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. J Pediatr, 137, 660-667.
Filteau SM, Rollins NC, Coutsoudis A, Sullivan KR, Willumsen JF, Tomkins AM, 2001. The effect of antenatal vitamin A and beta-carotene supplementation on gut integrity of infants of HIV-infected South African women. J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr, 32, 464-470.

Ghana VAST Study Team, 1993. Vitamin A supplementation in northern Ghana: effects on clinic attendances, hospital admissions, and child mortality. Ghana VAST Study Team. Lancet, 342, 7-12.
Glasziou PP and Mackerras DE, 1993. Vitamin A supplementation in infectious diseases: a meta-analysis. BMJ, 306, 366-370.

Henning B, Stewart K, Zaman K, Alam AN, Brown KH, Black RE, 1992. Lack of therapeutic efficacy of vitamin A for non-cholera, watery diarrhoea in Bangladeshi children. Eur J Clin Nutr, 46, 437-443.
Hossain S, Biswas R, Kabir I, Sarker S, Dibley M, Fuchs G, Mahalanabis D, 1998. Single dose vitamin A treatment in acute shigellosis in Bangladesh children: randomised double blind controlled trial. BMJ, 316, 422-426.
Huiming Y, Chaomin W, Meng M, 2005. Vitamin A for treating measles in children. Cochrane Database Syst Rev, CD001479.
Hussey GD and Klein M, 1990. A randomized, controlled trial of vitamin A in children with severe measles. N Engl J Med, 323, 160-164.

IoM (Institute of Medicine), 2001. Dietary Reference Intakes for Vitamin A, Vitamin K, Arsenic, Boron, Chromium, Copper, Iodine, Iron, Manganese, Molybdenum, Nickel, Silicon, Vanadium, and Zinc. National Academies Press, Washington DC.

Isolauri E, Joensuu J, Suomalainen H, Luomala M, Vesikari T, 1995. Improved immunogenicity of oral D x RRV reassortant rotavirus vaccine by Lactobacillus casei GG. Vaccine, 13, 310-312.

IVACG (International Vitamin A Consultative Group), 1997. Policy Statement on Vitamin A Status and Childhood Mortality.
IVACG (International Vitamin A Consultative Group), 1997. Policy Statement on Vitamin, Diarrhea, and Measles. 47 Iwata M, Eshima Y, Kagechika H, 2003. Retinoic acids exert direct effects on T cells to suppress Th1 development and enhance Th2 development via retinoic acid receptors. Int Immunol, 15, 1017-1025.

JHCI (Joint Health Claims Initiative), 2003. Final Technical Report. A List of Well Established Nutrient Function Statements. JHCI Ref: JHCI/76/03.

Lie C, Ying C, Wang EL, Brun T, Geissler C, 1993. Impact of large-dose vitamin A supplementation on childhood diarrhoea, respiratory disease and growth. Eur J Clin Nutr, 47, 88-96.
Long KZ, Santos JI, Estrada Garcia T, Haas M, Firestone M, Bhagwat J, Dupont HL, Hertzmark E, Rosado JL, Nanthakumar NN, 2006. Vitamin A supplementation reduces the monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 intestinal immune response of Mexican children. J Nutr, 136, 2600-2605.
Long KZ, Rosado JL, Fawzi W, 2007. The comparative impact of iron, the B-complex vitamins, vitamins C and E, and selenium on diarrheal pathogen outcomes relative to the impact produced by vitamin A and zinc. Nutr Rev, 65, 218-232.

Rahmathullah L, Underwood BA, Thulasiraj RD, Milton RC, Ramaswamy K, Rahmathullah R, Babu G, 1990. Reduced mortality among children in southern India receiving a small weekly dose of vitamin A. N Engl J Med, 323, 929-935.<
Reifen R, 2002. Vitamin A as an anti-inflammatory agent. Proc Nutr Soc, 61, 397-400.
Ruhl R, 2007. Effects of dietary retinoids and carotenoids on immune development. Proc Nutr Soc, 66, 458-461

 

SCF (Scientific Committee on Food), 2002. Opinion on the tolerable upper intake level of preformed vitamin A (retinol and retinyl esters).
Semba RD, 1999. Vitamin A and immunity to viral, bacterial and protozoan infections. Proc Nutr Soc, 58, 719-727.
Shankar AH, Genton B, Semba RD, Baisor M, Paino J, Tamja S, Adiguma T, Wu L, Rare L, Tielsch JM, Alpers MP, West KP, Jr., 1999. Effect of vitamin A supplementation on morbidity due to Plasmodium falciparum in young children in Papua New Guinea: a randomised trial. Lancet, 354, 203-209.
Sommer A, Tarwotjo I, Djunaedi E, West KP, Jr., Loeden AA, Tilden R, Mele L, 1986. Impact of vitamin A supplementation on childhood mortality. A randomised controlled community trial. Lancet, 1, 1169-1173.
Stephensen CB, 2001. Vitamin A, infection, and immune function. Annu Rev Nutr, 21, 167-192.

UNICEF, 2007. Vitamin A supplementation - A decade of progress. UNICEF.

 

West KP, Jr., Pokhrel RP, Katz J, LeClerq SC, Khatry SK, Shrestha SR, Pradhan EK, Tielsch JM, Pandey MR, Sommer A, 1991. Efficacy of vitamin A in reducing preschool child mortality in Nepal. Lancet, 338, 67-71.

West K, 2006. Deficiency and Interventions. In: Encyclopedia of Human Nutrition. Caballero B, Allen L, Prentice A (eds.). Academic Press, San Diego.
WHO (World Health Organization), Vitamin A supplementation, www.who.int/vaccines/en/vitamina.shtml.
Wintergerst ES, Maggini S, Hornig DH, 2007. Contribution of selected vitamins and trace elements to immune function. Ann Nutr Metab, 51, 301-323.

IoM (Institute of Medicine), 2001. Dietary Reference Intakes for Vitamin A, Vitamin K, Arsenic, Boron, Chromium, Copper, Iodine, Iron, Manganese, Molybdenum, Nickel, Silicon, Vanadium, and Zinc. National Academies Press, Washington DC. 

JHCI (Joint Health Claims Initiative), 2003. Final Technical Report A List of Well Established Nutrient Function Statements.

Mann J and Truswell S, 2002. Essentials of Human Nutrition. Oxford University Press USA, New York. 19 Sadler MJ, Strain JJ, Caballero B, 1999. Encyclopedia of Human Nutrition. Academic Press, San Diego. 20 SCF (Scientific Committee on Food), 2000. Opinion on the Tolerable Upper Intake Level of Beta Carotene. 21 SCF (Scientific Committee on Food), 2002. Opinion on the Tolerable Upper Intake Level of Preformed Vitamin A (retinol and retinyl esters). 22 WHO (World Health Organization) and UNCF (United Nations Childrens Fund), 1995. Global Prevalence of Vitamin A Deficiency - Micronutrient Deficiency Information System Working Paper No. 2.

ID 16: “Vitamin A” and “Vision ”

1 Avis de la commission interministérielle d‘étude des produits destinés à une alimentation particulière (CEDAP) en date du 18 décembre 1996 sur les recommandations relatives au caractère non trompeur des seuils des allégations nutritionnelles fonctionnelles. BOCCRF (Bulletin Officiel de la Concurrence, de la Consommation et de la Répression des fraudes) du 7 octobre 1997. 2 Ordonnance du Conseil Fédéral Suisse du 23 novembre 2005 sur les denrées alimentaires et les objets usuels (ODAIOUs). 3 Permitted Health Claims (Health Products and Food Branch of Health Canada, the Natural Health Products Directorate, NHPD) Food and Drug Regulations Section B.01.603. 4 Hager's Handbuch der pharmazeutischen Praxis Teil 1 - 10. 1972. Springer Verlag, Berlin. 5 Aue K, Ernährung aktuell: Vitamin A für Augen, Knochen und Immunsystem.

Bässler KH, Golly I, Loew D, Pietrzik K, 2002. Vitamin-Lexikon für Ärzte, Apotheker und Ernährungswissenschaftler. Gustav Fischer, Stuttgart, Jena. 7 Berdanier CD, Dwyer JT, Feldman EB, 2002. Handbook of Nutrition and Food. CRC Press. Taylor and Francis Book, Boca Raton. 8 Biesalski HK, Schrezenmeir J, Weber P, Weiss H, 1997. Vitamine. Physiologie, Pathophysiologie. Therapie. Stuttgart, Thieme. 9 Biesalski H-K, Köhrle J, Schümann K, 2002. Vitamine, Spurenelemente und Mineralstoffe: Prävention und Therapie mit Mikronährstoffen. Thieme Verlag, Stuttgart. 10 Biesalski HK, Fürst P, Kasper H, Kluthe R, Pölert W, Puchstein C, Stählin HB, 2004. Ernährungsmedizin. Georg Thieme Verlag, Stuttgart. 11 Calder PC and Kew S, 2002. The immune system: a target for functional foods? Br J Nutr, 88 Suppl 2, S165-177. 12 Chandra RK, 1991. 1990 McCollum Award lecture. Nutrition and immunity: lessons from the past and new insights into the future. Am J Clin Nutr, 53, 1087-1101. 13 COMA (Committee on Medicinal Aspects of Food Policy), 1991. Dietary Reference Values for Food Energy and Nutrients for the United Kingdom. HMSO, London. 14 D-A-CH (Deutsche Gesellschaft für Ernährung, Österreichische Gesellschaft für Ernährung, Schweizerische Gesellschaft für Ernährungsforschung, Schweizerische Vereinigung für Ernährung), 2000. Referenzwerte für die Nährstoffzufuhr. Umschau Braus Verlag, Frankfurt am Main. 15 Daniel H and Benterbusch R, 1991. Ernährung und Immunsystem. Deutsche Apotheker Zeitung, 131, 61-71. 16 De Luca LM, Darwiche N, Celli G, Kosa K, Jones C, Ross S, Chen LC, 1994. Vitamin A in epithelial differentiation and skin carcinogenesis. Nutr Rev, 52, S45-52. 17 Eichler O, Sies H, Stahl W, 2002. Divergent optimum levels of lycopene, beta-carotene and lutein protecting against UVB irradiation in human fibroblastst. Photochem Photobiol, 75, 503-506. 18 Elmadfa I and Leitzmann C, 1988. Ernährung des Menschen. Eugen Ulmer Verlag, Stuttgart. 19 EVM (Expert Group on Vitamins and Minerals), 2002. Revised Review of Vitamin A. 20 Falbe J and Regizt M, 2006. Römp Lexikon Chemie. Georg Thieme Verlag, Stuttgart. 21 FNFC/FOSHU (Food with Nutrient Functional Claims/Foods for Specified Health Use), Ministry of Health, Labour, and Welfare, Japan: Food with Health Claims, Food for Special Dietary Uses, and Nutrition Labeling www.mhlw.go.jp/english/topics/foodsafety/fhc/index.htm. 22 Garrow JS, James WPT, Ralph A, James WPT, 2000. Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Churchill Livingstone, London, Edinburgh. 23 Gibney M, Vorster H, Kok F, 2002. Introduction to Human Nutrition (The Nutrition Society Textbook). WileyBlackwell Chichister. 24 Gleeson M and Bishop NC, 2000. Elite athlete immunology: importance of nutrition. Int J Sports Med, 21 Suppl 1, S44-50. 25 Gröber U, 2002. Orthomolekulare Medizin,. Wissenschaftliche Verlagsgesellschaft, Stuttgart. 26 Hahn A, 2001. Nahrungsergänzungsmittel Fakten und Daten der zur Nahrungsergänzung meistverwendeten Stoffe. Wissenschaftliche Verlagsgesellschaft GmbH, Stuttgart. 27 Hahn A, Ströhle A, Wolters M, 2005. Ernährung–Physiologische Grundlagen, Prävention, Therapie.Wissenschaftliche Verlagsgesellschaft, Stuttgart. 28 Hänsel R, Keller K, Rimpler H, Schneider G, 1990 + 1995. Hager's Handbuch der pharmazeutischen Praxis Teil 1 - 10. Springer Verlag, Berlin.

 

 

IoM (Institute of Medicine), 2000. Dietary Reference Intakes for Vitamin C, Vitamin E, selenium and carotenoids. National Academies Press, Washington DC. 30 IoM (Institute of Medicine), 2001. Dietary Reference Intakes for Vitamin A, Vitamin K, Arsenic, Boron, Chromium, Copper, Iodine, Iron, Manganese, Molybdenum, Nickel, Silicon, Vanadium, and Zinc. National Academies Press, Washington DC. 31 JHCI (Joint Health Claims Initiative), 2003. Final Technical Report A List of Well Established Nutrient Function Statements. 32 Kasper H, 2004. Ernährungsmedizin und Diätetik. Elsevier GmbH Deutschland. 33 Löffler G and Petrides PE, 1997. Biochemie und Pathobiochemie. Springer-Verlag, Stuttgart. 34 Mann J and Truswell S, 2002. Essentials of Human Nutrition. Oxford University Press, USA. 35 NNR (Nordic Nutrition Recommendations), 2004. Integrating nutrition and physical activity. Nordic Council of Ministers, Copenhagen. 36 Sadler MJ, Strain JJ, Caballero B, 1999. Encyclopedia of Human Nutrition. Academic Press, San Diego. 37 SCF (Scientific Committee on Food), 2000. Opinion on the Tolerable Upper Intake Level of Beta Carotene. 38 SCF (Scientific Committee on Food), 2002. Opinion on the Tolerable Upper Intake Level of Preformed Vitamin A (retinol and retinyl esters). 39 Schwedt G, 2006. Die Vitamin A Gruppe nichr nur gegen Nachtblindheit. Deutsche Apotheker Zeitung, 38, 72-74. 40 Semba RD, 1999. Vitamin A and Immune Function. Military Strategies for Sustainment of Nutrition and Immune Function in the Field, 279. 41 Shils ME, Shike M, Olson JA, Ross C, 1999. Modern Nutrition in Health and Disease. Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Baltimore, Philadelphia. 42 Spallholz, Boyan, Driskell, 1999. Nutrition. CRC Press, Boca Raton. 43 Stephensen CB, 2001. Vitamin A, infection, and immune function. Annu Rev Nutr, 21, 167-192. 44 Thomas B, 2007. Manual of Dietetic Practice. Blackwell Publishers, Oxford. 45 Watzl B, Haensch GM, Pool-Zobel BL, 1994. Ernaehrung und Immunsystem. Ernährungs Umschau, 41, 368-377. 46 WHO (World Health Organization), 1995. Global Prevalence of Vitamin A Deficiency - Micronutrient Deficiency Information System Working Paper No. 2. 47 Zimmermann M, 2001. Burgerstein's Handbook of Nutrition: Micronutrients in the Prevention and Therapy of Disease. Thieme, Stuttgart.

ID 17: “Vitamin A” and “Bone/Teeth/Hair/Skin and Nail health”

1 Berdanier CD, Dwyer JT, Feldman EB, 2002. Handbook of Nutrition and Food. CRC Press. Taylor and Francis Book, Boca Raton. 2 EVM (Expert Group on Vitamins and Minerals), 2002. Revised Review of Vitamin C. 3 EVM (Expert Group on Vitamins and Minerals), 2002. Revised Review of Vitamin A. 4 EVM (Expert Group on Vitamins and Minerals), 2002. Revised Review of Riboflavin. 5 EVM (Expert Group on Vitamins and Minerals), 2003. Safe Upper Levels for Vitamins and Minerals. Food Standards Agency, London.

6 Garrow JS, James WPT, Ralph A, James WPT, 2000. Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Churchill Livingstone, London, Edinburgh.

 

35

7 Gibney M, Vorster H, Kok F, 2002. Introduction to Human Nutrition (The Nutrition Society Textbook) WileyBlackwell, Chichester. 8 IoM (Institute of Medicine), 2001. Dietary Reference Intakes for vitamin A, vitamin K, arsenic, boron, chromium, copper, iodine, iron, manganese, molybdenum, nickel, silicon, vanadium and zinc. National Academies Press, Washington D.C. 9 IoM (Institute of Medicine), 2000. Dietary Reference Intakes for Vitamin C, Vitamin E, selenium and carotenoids. National Academies Press, Washington DC. 10 Lakshmi R, Lakshmi AV, Bamji MS, 1990. Mechanism of impaired skin collagen maturity in riboflavin or pyridoxine deficiency. Journal of Biosciences, 15, 289-295. 11 Patek AJJR, Post J, Victor J, 1941. RIBOFLAVIN DEFICIENCY IN THE PIG. Am J Physiol, 133, 47-55. 12 Sadler MJ, Strain JJ, Caballero B, 1999. Encyclopedia of Human Nutrition. Academic Press, San Diego. 13 SCF (Scientific Committee on Food), Reports. 14 SCF (Scientific Committee on Food), 2002. Opinion on the Tolerable Upper Intake Level of Preformed Vitamin A (retinol and retinyl esters). 15 Schaefer AE, Whitehair CK, Elvehjem CA, 1947. The Importance of Riboflavin, Pantothenic Acid, Niacin and Pyridoxine in the Nutrition of Foxes: Two Figures. J. Nutr., 34, 131-139. 16 Shaw JH and Phillips PH, 1941. The Pathology of Riboflavin Deficiency in the Rat: Sixteen Figures. J. Nutr., 22, 345-358. 17 Thomas B and Bishop J, 2007. Manual of Dietetic Practice. Blackwell Publishers, Oxford.

ID 19: “Beta carotene” and “Antioxidants and aging”

1 Alaluf S, Heinrich U, Stahl W, Tronnier H, Wiseman S, 2002. Dietary carotenoids contribute to normal human skin color and UV photosensitivity. J Nutr, 132, 399-403. 2 Antille C, Tran C, Sorg O, Saurat JH, 2004. Topical beta-carotene is converted to retinyl esters in human skin ex vivo and mouse skin in vivo. Exp Dermatol, 13, 558-561. 3 Aro A, Mutanen M, Uusitupa M, 2005. Ravitsemustiede. Duodecim, Helsinki. 4 Astley SB, Elliott RM, Archer DB, Southon S, 2002(a). Increased cellular carotenoid levels reduce the persistence of DNA single-strand breaks after oxidative challenge. Nutr Cancer, 43, 202-213. 5 Astley SB and Lindsay DG, 2002(b). European Research on the Functional Effects of Dietary Antioxidants (EUROFEDA). Conclusions. Mol Aspects Med, 23, 287-291. 6 Bando N, Hayashi H, Wakamatsu S, Inakuma T, Miyoshi M, Nagao A, Yamauchi R, Terao J, 2004. Participation of singlet oxygen in ultraviolet-a-induced lipid peroxidation in mouse skin and its inhibition by dietary beta-carotene: an ex vivo study. Free Radic Biol Med, 37, 1854-1863. 7 Battistutta D, Williams DL, Green A, 2000. Effectiveness of daily sunscreen application and b-carotene intake for prevention of photaging: A community-based randomised trial (Abstract 58). 13th International Congress on Photobiology, San Francisco. 8 Bendich A, 2004. From 1989 to 2001: what have we learned about the "biological actions of beta-carotene"? J Nutr, 134, 225S-230S. 9 Biesalski HK and Obermueller-Jevic UC, 2001. UV light, beta-carotene and human skin--beneficial and potentially harmful effects. Arch Biochem Biophys, 389, 1-6. 10 Boelsma E, Hendriks HF, Roza L, 2001. Nutritional skin care: health effects of micronutrients and fatty acids. Am J Clin Nutr, 73, 853-864. 11 Bourgeois CF, 2003. Aging and antioxidant vitamins. In: Antioxidant Vitamins and health: Cardiovascular Disease, Cancer, Cataracts and Aging. Bourgeois CF (ed.) Hnb Pub, New York.

 

36

12 Bunout D, Barrera G, Hirsch S, Gattas V, de la Maza MP, Haschke F, Steenhout P, Klassen P, Hager C, Avendano M, Petermann M, Munoz C, 2004. Effects of a nutritional supplement on the immune response and cytokine production in free-living Chilean elderly. JPEN J Parenter Enteral Nutr, 28, 348-354. 13 Cesarini JP, Michel L, Maurette JM, Adhoute H, Bejot M, 2003. Immediate effects of UV radiation on the skin: modification by an antioxidant complex containing carotenoids. Photodermatol Photoimmunol Photomed, 19, 182-189. 14 Chew BP and Park JS, 2004. Carotenoid action on the immune response. J Nutr, 134, 257S-261S. 15 Eichler O, Sies H, Stahl W, 2002. Divergent optimum levels of lycopene, beta-carotene and lutein protecting against UVB irradiation in human fibroblastst. Photochem Photobiol, 75, 503-506. 16 Eicker J, Kurten V, Wild S, Riss G, Goralczyk R, Krutmann J, Berneburg M, 2003. Betacarotene supplementation protects from photoaging-associated mitochondrial DNA mutation. Photochem Photobiol Sci, 2, 655-659. 17 Fletcher AE, Breeze E, Shetty PS, 2003. Antioxidant vitamins and mortality in older persons: findings from the nutrition add-on study to the Medical Research Council Trial of Assessment and Management of Older People in the Community. Am J Clin Nutr, 78, 999-1010. 18 Fuller CJ, Faulkner H, Bendich A, Parker RS, Roe DA, 1992. Effect of beta-carotene supplementation on photosuppression of delayed-type hypersensitivity in normal young men. Am J Clin Nutr, 56, 684-690. 19 Garmyn M, Ribaya-Mercado JD, Russel RM, Bhawan J, Gilchrest BA, 1995. Effect of beta-carotene supplementation on the human sunburn reaction. Exp Dermatol, 4, 104-111. 20 Gollnick H, Hopfenmüller W, Hemmes C, Chun S, Schmid C, Sundermeier K, Biesalski H, 1996. Systemic beta carotene plus topical UV-sunscreen are an optimal protection against harmful effects of natural UV-sunlight: results of the Berlin-Eilath study. European Journal of Dermatology, 6, 200-205. 21 Goralczyk R and Wertz K, 2007. Skin photoprotection by carotenoids. In: Carotenoids: Part C Carotenoids against disease. Britton G, Liaaen-Jensen S, Pfander H (eds.). Birkhäuser, Basel. 22 Greul AK, Grundmann JU, Heinrich F, Pfitzner I, Bernhardt J, Ambach A, Biesalski HK, Gollnick H, 2002. Photoprotection of UV-irradiated human skin: an antioxidative combination of vitamins E and C, carotenoids, selenium and proanthocyanidins. Skin Pharmacol Appl Skin Physiol, 15, 307-315. 23 Griffiths HR, Moller L, Bartosz G, Bast A, Bertoni-Freddari C, Collins A, Cooke M, Coolen S, Haenen G, Hoberg AM, Loft S, Lunec J, Olinski R, Parry J, Pompella A, Poulsen H, Verhagen H, Astley SB, 2002. Biomarkers. Mol Aspects Med, 23, 101-208. 24 Grodstein F, Chen J, Willett WC, 2003. High-dose antioxidant supplements and cognitive function in community-dwelling elderly women. Am J Clin Nutr, 77, 975-984. 25 Heinrich U, Gartner C, Wiebusch M, Eichler O, Sies H, Tronnier H, Stahl W, 2003. Supplementation with beta-carotene or a similar amount of mixed carotenoids protects humans from UV-induced erythema. J Nutr, 133, 98-101. 26 Heinrich U, Tronnier H, Stahl W, Bejot M, Maurette JM, 2006. Antioxidant supplements improve parameters related to skin structure in humans. Skin Pharmacol Physiol, 19, 224-231. 27 Herraiz LA, Hsieh WC, Parker RS, Swanson JE, Bendich A, Roe DA, 1998. Effect of UV exposure and beta-carotene supplementation on delayed-type hypersensitivity response in healthy older men. J Am Coll Nutr, 17, 617-624. 28 Hughes DA, 1999. Effects of carotenoids on human immune function. Proc Nutr Soc, 58, 713-718. 29 Hughes DA, 2001. Dietary carotenoids and human immune function. Nutrition, 17, 823-827. 30 Iannuzzi A, Celentano E, Panico S, Galasso R, Covetti G, Sacchetti L, Zarrilli F, De Michele M, Rubba P, 2002. Dietary and circulating antioxidant vitamins in relation to carotid plaques in middle-aged women. Am J Clin Nutr, 76, 582-587.

31 IoM (Institute of Medicine), 2000. Beta-carotene and other carotenoids. In: Dietary Reference Intakes for Vitamin C, Vitamin E, Selenium, and Carotenoids. National Academies Press, Washington DC, 325-382

 

Jackson MJ, Papa S, Bolanos J, Bruckdorfer R, Carlsen H, Elliott RM, Flier J, Griffiths HR, Heales S, Holst B, Lorusso M, Lund E, Oivind Moskaug J, Moser U, Di Paola M, Polidori MC, Signorile A, Stahl W, Vina-Ribes J, Astley SB, 2002. Antioxidants, reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, gene induction and mitochondrial function. Mol Aspects Med, 23, 209-285. 33 Kopcke W and Krutmann J, 2008. Protection from sunburn with beta-Carotene--a meta-analysis. Photochem Photobiol, 84, 284-288. 34 Learning and Teaching Scotland Staff, 2005. Functions and sources of nutrients. In: Health and Food Technology: Resource Management Learning & Teaching Scotland. 35 Lee J, Jiang S, Levine N, Watson RR, 2000. Carotenoid supplementation reduces erythema in human skin after simulated solar radiation exposure. Proc Soc Exp Biol Med, 223, 170-174. 36 Lindsay DG and Astley SB, 2002. European research on the functional effects of dietary antioxidants - EUROFEDA. Mol Aspects Med, 23, 1-38. 37 Mason P, 2001. Dietary Supplements. Pharmaceutical Press, London. 38 Mathews-Roth MM, Pathak MA, Parrish J, Fitzpatrick TB, Kass EH, Toda K, Clemens W, 1972. A clinical trial of the effects of oral beta-carotene on the responses of human skin to solar radiation. J Invest Dermatol, 59, 349-353. 39 Matos HR, Marques SA, Gomes OF, Silva AA, Heimann JC, Di Mascio P, Medeiros MH, 2006. Lycopene and beta-carotene protect in vivo iron-induced oxidative stress damage in rat prostate. Braz J Med Biol Res, 39, 203-210. 40 McArdle F, Rhodes LE, Parslew RA, Close GL, Jack CI, Friedmann PS, Jackson MJ, 2004. Effects of oral vitamin E and beta-carotene supplementation on ultraviolet radiation-induced oxidative stress in human skin. Am J Clin Nutr, 80, 1270-1275. 41 Moller P and Loft S, 2006. Dietary antioxidants and beneficial effect on oxidatively damaged DNA. Free Radic Biol Med, 41, 388-415. 42 Obermuller-Jevic UC, Francz PI, Frank J, Flaccus A, Biesalski HK, 1999. Enhancement of the UVA induction of haem oxygenase-1 expression by beta-carotene in human skin fibroblasts. FEBS Lett, 460, 212-216. 43 O'Connor I and O'Brien N, 1998. Modulation of UVA light-induced oxidative stress by beta-carotene, lutein and astaxanthin in cultured fibroblasts. J Dermatol Sci, 16, 226-230. 44 Offord EA, Gautier JC, Avanti O, Scaletta C, Runge F, Kramer K, Applegate LA, 2002. Photoprotective potential of lycopene, beta-carotene, vitamin E, vitamin C and carnosic acid in UVA-irradiated human skin fibroblasts. Free Radic Biol Med, 32, 1293-1303. 45 Postaire E, Jungmann H, Bejot M, Heinrich U, Tronnier H, 1997. Evidence for antioxidant nutrients-induced pigmentation in skin: results of a clinical trial. Biochem Mol Biol Int, 42, 1023-1033. 46 Ross AC, 2006. Vitamin and carotenoids: Antioxidant properties of carotenoids. In: Modern Nutrition in Health and Disease. Shils M, Shike M, Ross C, Caballero B, Cousins R (eds.). Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Baltimore, Philadephia, 365-366. 47 Salonen RM, Nyyssonen K, Kaikkonen J, Porkkala-Sarataho E, Voutilainen S, Rissanen TH, Tuomainen TP, Valkonen VP, Ristonmaa U, Lakka HM, Vanharanta M, Salonen JT, Poulsen HE, 2003. Six-year effect of combined vitamin C and E supplementation on atherosclerotic progression: the Antioxidant Supplementation in Atherosclerosis Prevention (ASAP) Study. Circulation, 107, 947-953. 48 Skoog ML, Ollinger K, Skogh M, 1997. Microfluorometry using fluorescein diacetate reflects the integrity of the plasma membrane in UVA-irradiated cultured skin fibroblasts. Photodermatol Photoimmunol Photomed, 13, 37-42. 49 Someya K, Totsuka Y, Murakoshi M, Kitano H, Miyazawa T, 1994. The effect of natural carotenoid (palm fruit carotene) intake on skin lipid peroxidation in hairless mice. J Nutr Sci Vitaminol (Tokyo), 40, 303-314.

 

Stahl W and Sies H, 1993. Physical quenching of singlet oxygen and cis-trans isomerization of carotenoids. Ann NY Acad Sci, 691, 10-19. 51 Stahl W, Heinrich U, Jungmann H, Sies H, Tronnier H, 2000. Carotenoids and carotenoids plus vitamin E protect against ultraviolet light-induced erythema in humans. Am J Clin Nutr, 71, 795-798. 52 Stahl W, van den Berg H, Arthur J, Bast A, Dainty J, Faulks RM, Gartner C, Haenen G, Hollman P, Holst B, Kelly FJ, Polidori MC, Rice-Evans C, Southon S, van Vliet T, Vina-Ribes J, Williamson G, Astley SB, 2002. Bioavailability and metabolism. Mol Aspects Med, 23, 39-100. 53 Stahl W and Sies H, 2005. Bioactivity and protective effects of natural carotenoids. Biochim Biophys Acta, 1740, 101-107. 54 Torbergsen AC and Collins AR, 2000. Recovery of human lymphocytes from oxidative DNA damage; the apparent enhancement of DNA repair by carotenoids is probably simply an antioxidant effect. Eur J Nutr, 39, 80-85. 55 Trekli MC, Riss G, Goralczyk R, Tyrrell RM, 2003. Beta-carotene suppresses UVA-induced HO-1 gene expression in cultured FEK4. Free Radic Biol Med, 34, 456-464. 56 Wei RR, Wamer WG, Lambert LA, Kornhauser A, 1998. beta-Carotene uptake and effects on intracellular levels of retinol in vitro. Nutr Cancer, 30, 53-58. 57 Wertz K, Hunziker PB, Seifert N, Riss G, Neeb M, Steiner G, Hunziker W, Goralczyk R, 2005. beta-Carotene interferes with ultraviolet light A-induced gene expression by multiple pathways. J Invest Dermatol, 124, 428-434. 58 Wertz K, Seifert N, Hunziker PB, Riss G, Wyss A, Hunziker W, Goralczyk R, 2006. Beta-carotene interference with UVA-induced gene expression by multiple pathways. Pure and Applied Chemistry, 78, 1539-1550. 59 Wolf C, Steiner A, Honigsmann H, 1988. Do oral carotenoids protect human skin against ultraviolet erythema, psoralen phototoxicity, and ultraviolet-induced DNA damage? J Invest Dermatol, 90, 55-57. 60 Zhao X, Aldini G, Johnson EJ, Rasmussen H, Kraemer K, Woolf H, Musaeus N, Krinsky NI, Russell RM, Yeum KJ, 2006. Modification of lymphocyte DNA damage by carotenoid supplementation in postmenopausal women. Am J Clin Nutr, 83, 163-169.

 

"beta-Carotin ist als Quelle für Vitamin A unerlässlich"

Unzureichender Vitamin-A-Spiegel hat Konsequenzen für die G

idw-online.de/pages/de/news341132

"beta-Carotin ist als Quelle für Vitamin A unerlässlich"

Unzureichender Vitamin-A-Spiegel hat Konsequenzen für die Gesundheit/ Mediziner diskutieren Folgen an der Universität Hohenheim

 

Digitale Pressemappe unter www.uni-hohenheim.de/presse

Die Versorgung der deutschen Bevölkerung mit Vitamin A ist teilweise unzureichend. beta-Carotin-reiche Lebensmittel alleine genügen nicht, um die wünschenswerte tägliche Vitamin- A-Zufuhr sicher zu stellen. Diesen Schluss zog Ernährungsmediziner Prof. Dr. med. Hans K. Biesalski als Gastgeber des 2. Hohenheimer Ernährungsgespräches aus den Erhebungen der Nationalen Verzehrsstudie. Einen Tag lang hatten Experten am vergangenen Freitag die Ursachen und Folgen der unzureichenden Vitamin-A-Versorgung diskutiert. Betroffen seien vor allem Schulkinder und Senioren über 60. Abhilfe schaffe am ehesten eine gemüsebetonte Mischkost, die aber auch Fleisch und tierische Produkte enthalte. Besonders ergiebige Vitamin-A-Quellen seien Leber, fetter Fisch und Butter, Käse, oder Eier. Wertvolles beta-Carotin lieferten Karotten als Saft oder Kochgemüse, Mangos und jede Art gelbes und tiefgrünes Gemüse. Von beta-Carotin, so das allgemeine Fazit, geht keine Gefahr aus. Gefährlich ist viel mehr, wenn man zu wenig davon hat.

 

Den wertvollsten Beitrag zur Gesundheit liefere Vitamin A durch dessen Bedeutung beim Aufbau der Schleimhäute in Mund, Lungen und Nasen-Rachen-Raum sowie bei der Abwehr von infektiösen Krankheiten und in der Embryogenese, erklärte Prof. Dr. med. h.c. Helmut Sies als Referent des Universitätsklinikum Düsseldorf. Folglich ist eine gute Versorgung mit Provitamin A und Vitamin A eine wichtige Grundlage gerade in der kalten Jahreszeit. Vitamin A sichert den Aufbau von Körperbarrieren, die von essentieller Bedeutung für den Schutz gegen Krankheitserreger seien.

 

Dabei könne der Körper seinen täglichen Bedarf von 1 Milligramm Vitamin A auf zwei Wegen decken: Durch Nahrungsmittel mit reinem Vitamin A - dazu gehören rotes Fleisch, vor allem Leber, und auch andere tierische Produkte - oder durch beta-Carotin - einem Provitamin, das der Körper selbst in Vitamin A umwandeln kann. Zu den Nahrungsmitteln mit hohem beta-Carotin-Anteil gehörten jede Art von gelbem oder tiefgrünem Gemüse, vor allem aber Karotten, solange sie gekocht oder zu Saft gepresst verzehrt würden.

 

"Entsprechend den nationalen Ernährungsgewohnheiten wird die tägliche Einnahme von Vitamin A fast zu 50 Prozent durch beta-Carotin gedeckt", sagte Dr. Georg Lietz, von der britischen Newcastle University. Vor allem Vegetarier und insbesondere Veganer seien als besondere Risikogruppe auf ausreichend Vitamin A angewiesen. "Der empfohlene Tagesbedarf für beta-Carotin von 2-4 Milligramm ist zu niedrig, um die momentane Lücke in der Vitamin-A-Zufuhr zu schließen", so das Fazit von Dr. Lietz.

 

Allerdings gäbe es auch einen nicht unerheblichen Bevölkerungsanteil, dessen Stoffwechsel aufgrund seiner genetischen Veranlagung schlecht in der Lage sei, das beta-Carotin in körpereigenes Vitamin A umzuwandeln. Diese sogenannten "Low-Responder" können bislang nur in wenigen Speziallabors erkannt werden, so dass die sicherste Gesundheitsvorsorge am ehesten durch eine ausgewogene Mischkost erreicht werden kann, die auch tierische Produkte enthält. So wäre eine Scheibe Leber alle 14 Tage schon ausreichend, um den Bedarf an Vitamin A zu decken", rechnet Prof. Dr. Biesalski.

 

Zusatzschutz gegen UV-Licht

 

Auf eine weitere Schutzwirkung - den Schutz der Haut gegen UV-Strahlung mit der Gefahr von Sonnenbrand und Hautkrebs - wies die Hautärztin Dr. med. Andrea Krautheim vom Informationsverbund Dermatologischer Kliniken hin: "Durch die Einnahme von beta-Carotin lässt sich erwiesenermaßen eine moderate Schutzwirkung vor einer Sonnenbrandreaktion erreichen."

 

Dabei handelt es sich um einen Effekt, der sich durch gezielte Kombinationen mit anderen Antioxidantien eventuell noch weiter steigern lassen könnte. "Neben dem bewussten Umgang mit UV-Strahlung, Sonnencremes und angepasster Kleidung wäre ein zusätzlich unterstützender Sonnenschutz durch geeignete Supplementierung nur wünschenswert", so Dr. Krautheim.

 

Fazit

 

Einigkeit herrschte unter den Referenten, dass das beta-Carotin in der jüngeren Vergangenheit zu Unrecht in die Negativ-Schlagzeilen geriet. "In der Krebsforschung galt dieses Pro-Vitamin lange Zeit als Hoffnungsträger - bis Studien zeigten, dass hohe Konzentrationen (mehr als das 10-fache des täglichen Bedarfs) über lange Zeit das Lungenkrebsrisiko bei Rauchern erhöhen ", so Prof. Dr. Biesalski.

 

Anders jedoch bei natürlichen beta-Carotin-Quellen in der täglichen Ernährung: "Hier können wir mit Sicherheit davon ausgehen, dass beta-Carotin aus Lebensmitteln, angereicherten Säften oder niedrig dosierten Supplementen als sicher angesehen werden können", erklärte der Ernährungsmediziner der Universität Hohenheim. Wir müssen uns also nicht vor zu viel beta-Carotin schützen, vielmehr vor zu wenig!

 

HINTERGRUND: Hohenheimer Ernährungsgespräche

 

Ziel der Hohenheimer Ernährungsgespräche ist es, ausgewiesene Fachvertreter zusammen zu führen, um aktuelle Themen der Ernährung in kompetenten, glaubwürdigen und unabhängigen Analysen zu beleuchten. Gastgeber der halbjährlichen Diskussionsrunde ist Prof. Dr. med. Hans K. Biesalski, Direktor des Instituts für Biologische Chemie und Ernährungswissenschaft der Universität Hohenheim. Veranstaltungsort ist die Universität Hohenheim, die mit ihrem ganzheitlichen Forschungskonzept der Agrar- und Ernährungswissenschaften im Rahmen der Food-Chain eine bundesweit einzigartige Kompetenz aufweisen kann.

 

Ansprechperson:

Jana Tinz, Universität Hohenheim, Institut für Biologische Chemie und Ernährungswissenschaft

Tel.: 0711 459-24113/22291; tinzjana@uni-hohenheim.de

 

URL dieser Pressemitteilung: idw-online.de/pages/de/news341132

 

Vitamin A und Asthma

www.aid.de/presse/presseinfo.php

Die Dosis macht die Wirkung: Vitamin A-Einfluss auf Asthma?

 

(aid) - Die Zahl der Asthmatiker liegt in Ländern mit westlichem Lebensstandard höher als in weniger entwickelten Staaten. Experten vermuten, dass neben der stärkeren Luftverschmutzung auch künstliche Zusätze in Lebensmitteln dafür verantwortlich sein könnten. Verschiedene Studien lassen auf einen Zusammenhang zwischen zugesetzten Stoffen und der Ausbildung allergischer Reaktionen, wie Asthma, schließen. Das gilt vor allem für die häufig zugesetzten Vitamine A und D, deren aktive Formen intensiv mit dem Immunsystem interagieren. Versuche zur Wirkung von Vitamin A auf die Immunantwort führten bisher zu widersprüchlichen Ergebnissen. Studien mit Mäusen ergaben für einige Immunerkrankungen positive Effekte. Dagegen zeigte eine schwedische Untersuchung, dass sich bei Säuglingen mit Vitamin A-Supplementierung das Risiko für Asthma verdoppelt. Eine aktuelle Studie untersuchte nun den möglichen Einfluss von Vitamin A-Supplementen auf die Ausbildung einer asthmatischen Erkrankung. Dabei wurden gesunde Mäuse mit allergieauslösenden Proteinen und Hausstaub "geimpft". Gleichzeitig erhielten sie 15 Tage lang regelmäßig Retinsäure, die aktive Form des Vitamin A, in unterschiedlichen Dosen. Anschließend untersuchte man die Zahl und das Verhältnis definierter Immunzellen, wie Immunglobulin E und Interleukin, im Bronchialsekret der Tiere. Alle Mäuse, die eine Vitamin A-Ergänzung erhielten, wiesen für die untersuchten Immunzellen signifikant höhere Werte auf als die Vergleichsgruppe ohne Vitaminergänzung. Auffällig war, dass die Zahl der Immunzellen bei der höchsten Vitamin A-Gabe im Gegensatz zur niedrigen und mittleren Dosis wieder deutlich zurückging. Das bestätigte auch ein durchgeführter Lungenfunktionstest, bei dem allergische Mäuse ohne Vitaminzugabe deutlich schlechter abschnitten als die Vergleichsgruppe mit der Höchstdosis Vitamin A. Trotz der Ergebnisse halten die Forscher aus Schweden, Spanien und Dänemark eine Vitamin A-Supplementierung bei Kleinkindern in Ländern mit nachgewiesenem Mangel weiterhin für sinnvoll. In westlichen Staaten scheint dagegen die Dosis der Supplementierung darüber zu entscheiden, ob Vitamin A an der Ausbildung von Asthma beteiligt ist, oder sogar einen therapeutischen Nutzen haben kann. Dazu seien aber noch detailliertere Studien notwendig.

 

aid, Jürgen Beckhoff

 

 

H.A.P.C. Oomen & Johanna Ten Doesschate: The periodicity of xerophthalmia in South and East Asia Ecology of Food and Nutrition 2(3) 207-217 (1973) - DOI:10.1080/03670244.1973.9990338 - Version of record first published: 01 Sep 2010 - Citations: 3

Many factors are responsible for the onset of demonstrable eye pathology in hypovitaminosis A. These factors apply equally to the child as a single person or as a member of a population group. Besides a marginal vitamin A status, the most common factors are protein calorie malnutrition, both of the kwashiorkor and marasmic varieties, and the diarrhoea and infectious diseases of childhood.

In this study, the incidence reported from four ophthalmic hospitals in Vietnam, India and Indonesia, is analysed. Although there were irregular annual fluctuations in incidence, a regular perennial pattern was present in all four locations. Two annual peak periods occurred in Hanoi, and one in Bangalore, Sourabaya and Bandung. It is suggested that the sinusoidal incidence pattern in Sourabaya and Bandung was connected with climatological variation, especially solar radiation.

Periodicity in the incidence of xerophthalmia may point to fluctuations or tides in retinol levels in the serum of the child population. Waves of xerophthalmia or a definite seasonal prevalence are important and must be taken into consideration in surveys directed at determining vitamin A status. If xerophthalmia waves are predictable, preventive measures such as the periodic massive dosing of vitamin A by mouth should be implemented at the most appropriate time for them to be optimally efficacious.

www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/03670244.1973.9990338